Menu Sidebar
Menu

Leading Women to STEM Careers

Once they hit middle school, girls often move away from STEM-related careers. School counselors can help middle and high school girls keep all their options open.

Careers in STEM exert significant influence and power, shaping nearly every aspect of our lives. Yet, women (diverse in race, ethnicity, class, age, gender identity, abilities, and other historically marginalized identities) are underrepresented in the field. And, even when present, they may find themselves in unwelcoming cultures that impede their participation as innovators, leaders, and researchers who are shaping the future.

Most college students majoring in STEM make that choice during high school. Unfortunately, despite the increasing demand for professionals in the field, some young women don’t automatically think of STEM careers when planning their future.

Students who lack a strong STEM role model in their life or who haven’t had access to adequate STEM learning may not automatically consider a career in STEM. Further, self-doubt can arise for students who don’t have confidence in themselves and their abilities. Questions — “Can I be competitive with peers in this major? Is there a place for me in this field?” — may loom in their minds. Such students’ paths can be influenced by the help of a school counselor.

A school counselor’s role

“As part of their commitment to equity, school counselors work to raise awareness and encourage students to explore all avenues for their future careers, not just those that are stereotypically gendered,” said Jill Cook, executive director of the American School Counselor Association.

School counselors actively advocate for equitable policies, procedures, practices, and attitudes, embracing equity in opportunities and access to resources for all students and colleagues. School counselors are vigilant in countering the harmful effects of stereotypical gender-role expectations. “Persistent, subconscious images of male mathematicians and scientists that start at the earliest ages may be one explanation why girls enter STEM fields at dramatically lower rates than boys,” according to Edutopia.

School counselors are essential allies for bridging this gap in information and experience, providing career-shaping information to students and their families. School counselors provide and advocate for individual students’ college and career awareness, exploration, and postsecondary planning and decision making, which support the students’ right to choose from the wide array of options when students complete high school. By focusing on a growth mindset, school counselors help students understand that, “their most basic abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work,” according to Carol Dweck, author of the book Mindset.  “Brains and talent are just the starting point.”

But school counselors can also influence school leaders on which courses to offer and evaluate how the courses match the existing experiences of students. “I set about identifying the changes I could influence. It became evident that the overarching themes were equity and access to classes that could have an impact on postsecondary plans. By looking at class enrollment data, we made intentional changes to the master schedule, dropped outdated prerequisites, and monitored for our implicit bias,” said Jennifer Correnti, a school counseling director in New Jersey.

Addressing comfort

School counselors can also help teachers address unconscious bias in the physical environment of classrooms. “The physical environment conveys messages to students about who belongs in computing and who doesn’t. Rooms decorated with images and objects associated with geeky stereotypes are typically less appealing and welcoming to women than are gender-neutral rooms. Knowing this, you can craft an environment that makes a broad range of people feel welcome,” according to The National Center for Women in Technology.

When school counselors have training and expertise in creating inclusive spaces where all students feel welcome, comfortable, and supported, they can help other educators improve their physical spaces.

By actively advocating for equitable policies, procedures, practices, and attitudes and embracing equity in opportunities and access to resources for all students and colleagues, school counselors can help young women interested in STEM careers reach their goals.

Author Terry Hogan, President and CTO, The National Center for Women in Technology; Angela Cleveland, Program Director, NCWIT Counselors for Computing, us.editorial@mediaplanet.com

Tips for Acing the Virtual College Interview

College interviews are making a comeback. While many schools never abandoned the one-on-one interview, others are beginning to see the value in meeting with a student to gather additional information for an application process now missing one key component—test scores. 

As over 1665 or more than 70% of four-year colleges and universities have implemented test-optional policies, institutions previously dependent on scores for evaluating students are looking for ways to evaluate students using other metrics—those more aligned with assessing character. And what better way to probe character issues than by actually meeting and interviewing a student? 

 In addition to supporting assessment, the interview can be another marketing opportunity for colleges anxious to replace campus visits as occasions to sell the institution and all it has to offer. And the feedback gathered from a student can be yet another tool for assessing interest or perceived “fit.” 

But just as COVID-19 has pushed colleges into adopting test-optional policies, the virus has also made it all but impossible for them to conduct in-person interviews. And for better or worse, the virtual interview has its own quirks and subtleties. While students are largely accustomed to interacting in a classroom environment over the internet, the interpersonal element in an interview requires the student to be more attentive to communication details. 

To start, the virtual interview may be conducted over any one of several popular video chat or conferencing platforms—each with its own advantages or disadvantages. The most popular are Zoom, Skype, FaceTime or Google Hangout. But be aware that the interviewer decides the format, and it’s up to you to familiarize yourself with the platform making sure you have any required software on your computer, tablet or phone. 

Once that’s established, it’s time to drill down into details. And here are some tips for acing your virtual college interview: 

DO: 

  • Find a quiet, appropriate space where you can have the call.
    Be aware of your background—plain and uncluttered is ideal. 
    Make sure your computer is charged-up if you’re using a laptop—better yet, plug it in! 
  • Check your lighting and try to position the camera so that you are facing a light source and not the other way around. 
  • Test the technology. Before the interview, schedule a test call with a friend, family member or anyone who has been working with you throughout the application process. 
  • Ensure your microphone and speakers are working on the day of the interview and that your internet connection is stable and supports high-quality live video. 
  • Secure your device if using a phone or tablet—shaky or wobbly video is annoying. 
  • Be sure to use a professional screen name (first and last) that will be easy for the interviewer to recognize. 
  • Eliminate background noise and distractions—barking dogs, while sometimes unavoidable, distract you as much as your interviewer. Keep Fido out of the interview, if possible. Close windows and turn off the TV. 
  • Silence personal devices. 
  • Choose a small, comfortable and upright chair. Slouching on a couch isn’t engaging and sprawled out on a bed is disrespectful. 
  • Dress appropriately—top and bottom (you never know). Logo gear is not advisable, especially when it’s from another college. Avoid clothing featuring small patterns or colors that might not come across well on the screen. 
  • Try to make eye contact by looking directly into the camera. Nodding will show the interviewer that you are involved and listening attentively. Feel free to use your hands if it comes naturally to you. 
  • Have a backup plan in case of glitches. Transitioning to a phone or rescheduling for an alternate time are both possible solutions for technical difficulties. Try not to panic if your software experiences an issue. If the problem is outside of your control, the interviewer will understand. 
  • Follow-up with a thank-you note.


DO NOT:

  • Schedule an appointment without noting it on your calendar. 
  • Assume the interview will be in your time zone. Verify with the interviewer the time zone of the interview and be ready to begin at the agreed-upon time. 
  • Have your parent(s) sit in on the meeting. There’s nothing worse than having someone lurking off camera prompting responses. And don’t let them hover anxiously outside the room. Hang a “Do Not Disturb” sign outside your door if necessary. 
  • Neglect to introduce yourself. 
  • Come to the interview unprepared. An interviewer can tell in a minute if you have absolutely no knowledge of the college for which you are interviewing.
  • Get too cute with virtual backgrounds or screen names. If you must use a virtual background, choose something professional—not a picture of a closet filled with toilet paper as one student recently used. 
  • Turn off or disable your webcam. Part of the purpose of the face-to-face interview is for the interviewer to see how you interact as well as how you respond to specific questions. 
  • Try to record the interview. 
  • Forget to smile. Speaking into a computer is a little unnatural, but it’s important to try not to act like a robot. 
  • Sit in a dark room—it’s a little creepy. 
  • Watch yourself instead of the interviewer. 
  • Talk over your interviewer. Zoom has a built-in lag and it’s sometimes easy to jump in too soon. Practice your timing and use the pause to your advantage as a moment to consider your answer. 
  • Check email/phone/web while on the call as others can easily tell when you are distracted. And it’s a clear signal that you’re disinterested. 
  • Eat or chew gum or wear a hat unless there is a religious reason to do so.
  • Fail to say thank you and follow-up with a note.

Nancy Griesemer is an independent college consultant practicing in Oakton, Virginia. She has two children who survived the college admissions process and a very large tabby cat who sits in on many of my counseling sessions. Her credentials include degrees from Penn and Harvard, professional membership in the Independent Educational Consultants Association (IECA) as well as the Higher Education Consultants Association (HECA), and a Certificate in College Counseling from UCLA. As a professional college consultant, she support students and families navigating their own personal college explorations. Check her blog out at http://collegeexplorations.blogspot.com/

What does my deferral really mean?

This is a question you might get asked by your students. Lee Bierer of College Admissions Strategies wrote a great blog piece below that can help your students answer that question:

Being deferred is NOT the same as being rejected. It may feel that way for students, but this year with a record number of early applications there has also been a record number of deferrals.

A student who applies through either early action or early decision is deferred when a college determines that the student has potential but they want to see first semester senior grades to confirm. So without sounding overly Pollyana-ish, being deferred gives a student a second chance to impress the admissions office.

So how should a student respond to a deferral?

  1. Visit the college – If possible, if you haven’t toured the campus, this is a great time to make the visit. Even if you have visited previously, a follow-up visit where you sit in on a class and/or meet with someone from admissions is an opportunity to set yourself apart from other deferred applicants. Also, a campus visit can really help you determine where this college ranks in your desirability scale. Plan to eat lunch in the cafeteria and have conversations with current students. These informal discussions can often provide insightful comments.
  2. Contact your admissions representative – Find out which person in the admissions office handles your geographic territory. Take the opportunity to introduce yourself via email and ask that person if they can share any thoughts on how you could improve your application. Listen to what they say, don’t argue or complain.  It is important to be upbeat and leave a positive impression.
  3. Write a letter – Send it to the Director of Admissions as well as your admissions representative. The letter should focus on your strongest attributes and how you will be able to contribute to the college community. Demonstrate your interest and your commitment. If you are 100% sure that if you are accepted you will attend, then say so. Talk about college fit; why the college is a good fit for you and why you are a good fit for the college. Use the letter to update the admissions office on any new information such as leadership roles in clubs, athletic accomplishments, awards, scholarships, etc.
  4. Send your mid-year transcript. Most colleges will specifically request that you send your seventh semester grades. Follow instructions to the letter and get it done as quickly as possible. Timing can be an important factor.

Here’s what not to do?

  • Don’t whine and complain to the Admissions Office that you really deserve to be accepted
  • Don’t send volumes of emails, snail mail or packages hoping to change their minds
  • Don’t accuse the admissions office of making a mistake in their decision
  • Don’t compare your SAT scores and GPA with someone else’s
  • Don’t over-boast about small accomplishments, tell it like it is. It is not really worth it to share that your SAT score went up 10 points.

Lee Bierer is an independent college adviser based in Charlotte. Send questions to: lee@collegeadmissionsstrategies.com; www.collegeadmissionsstrategies.com

If your students choose to take College classes online take note of this fact about their financial aid

U.S. News and World Report recently published a blog that showed taking college classes online can really affect the financial aid a student receives from traditional Colleges.

When a college offers the option to either learn from home or return to campus and a student chooses the former, the financial aid office typically recalculates his or her cost of attendance. The cost of attendance is the total cost for the school year and includes tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, and other expenses. This cost, along with a student’s financial information provided on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, is used to calculate how much financial aid a student can receive.

Similar to the calculations made for commuter students, a college may reduce estimated living and meal expenses for a student who learns remotely from the family home during the coronavirus pandemic. This translates to the possible elimination of institutional grants and other financial aid opportunities, and may be a rude awakening for students this spring and beyond when they realize the financial impact of choosing to study at home.

For this reason, experts urge students to ask their financial aid office about the college’s policy around cost of attendance recalculations during the pandemic before making the decision to study virtually or on campus.

This is definitely something your students should note as they begin planning for their futures.

Here is a link to the U.S. News and World Report article: https://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/paying-for-college/articles/how-taking-college-classes-remotely-amid-coronavirus-can-cost-you

Distracted Driving is a big issue with teens

A 2016 survey from State Farm found 94% of drivers said they thought texting was a distracting behavior behind the wheel, but 35% still did it anyway. In 2018, an estimated 2,841 people in the U.S. died in distraction-affected crashes, according to the National Safety Council. Teenagers text while driving at an even higher rate and many accidents are caused by this behavior. They’re three times more likely to be involved in an accident than drivers aged 20 and older.

The graphic below by Reviews.com gives some safety tips you can use with your students to discuss the perils of distracted driving:

Download this infographic here

Check out the article from Reviews.com that discusses What distracted driving is and why it is even worse at night here: https://www.reviews.com/insurance/car/how-to-avoid-driving-distracted/

5 Essential Steps to Becoming a Teacher

Are any of your students interested in becoming a teacher? They might be wondering how to turn your career vision into reality. Here are some tips that will guide them through everything from deciding which subject to teach to getting their teaching license.

Choose a Grade

First, they will need to determine which grade level they want to teach. Teaching high school is very different from teaching kindergarten, so it’s important to consider which students they would prefer to work with. Elementary school students are curious and enthusiastic about learning, middle school students are figuring out their places in the world, and high school students are planning for the next big chapter in their lives.  

Decide on the Subject

Which subject should they teach? Ideally, they will be able to identify a subject that they enjoy discussing and understand deeply. They might also want to look at subjects that fewer teachers pursue, as this could open up more job opportunities. For instance, the Edvocate states that mathematics, English, and social sciences are all in-demand subjects. With fewer teachers applying for these positions, they will have less competition when job searching! Ultimately, they want to select a subject that they are passionate about.

Earn Their Degree

To get that first teaching job, they will need to have a bachelor’s degree. Most four-year Colleges have programs for teachers. However, they do necessarily have to attend a brick-and-mortar college – they can secure their teaching license by earning their teaching degree online! This option can be more affordable and convenient for many aspiring teachers. In addition to finishing their bachelor’s program, their state will likely require them to submit academic transcripts, go through a background check, and complete entrance exams and skills tests. Keep in mind that, in the future, they may also want to earn a master’s degree to increase earning potential.

Landing a Job

Once they have gotten their bachelor’s degree, they have their teaching license and should be more than ready to get into the classroom – now, they just need to find a job at the right school! In order to make a great first impression to potential employers, they will need to prepare answers to common interview questions in advance. The Muse states that they will likely be asked why they want to be a teacher, how they would handle difficult students, and how they would structure a typical lesson. They should try rehearsing answers with a friend so that they can give them feedback – this should give them more confidence when they start interviewing.

Prepare for Online Learning

Today’s teachers understand that not all learning takes place in a traditional classroom. Experiential learning and remote learning are also valid educational methods (even more so during COVID-19). Make sure that they are ready to teach virtually if the need arises. They will need a reliable laptop and an external webcam, and they may also want to upgrade your Internet connection.

Teaching can be a very rewarding career. By helping your students make the right decisions about their subject, grade level, and degree program, you can help your students achieve their dreams.

3 Steps to Resetting Your Morning Routine

The COVID-19 pandemic is affecting everyone differently. As a counselor, helping students, faculty and parents cope with stress is a part of your job, however due to today’s climate it’s more important than ever to advocate for your mental health and make sure your needs are being met. 

Prioritizing yourself doesn’t mean being selfish and can look differently for everybody. For some it might mean waking up earlier to set aside time for self-care and for others it could mean ending the day with a bedtime routine filled with relaxation. 

Whatever your style, we encourage you to reset your morning routine to be geared towards productivity, intention and wellness. Not quite sure where to start? Tommy John created a three step approach to help school counselors reset their routine for success during this turbulent time. 

Step 1: Practice Mindfulness 

It’s easy to go through the motions these days. Due to the current climate, being present can be difficult when there are so many distractions. When creating a routine rooted in success, it’s important to prioritize practicing mindfulness to ready your brain for focus all day. It may sound silly, but the act of being mindfully aware in the first 10 minutes of your morning allows you to start the day on the right foot. Try saying a mantra like “I am capable of handing anything that the day might bring” to center yourself and start the day with a fresh perspective.

Step 2: Practice Gratitude 

Practicing gratitude is the best way to gain perspective on days when you’ve woken up on the wrong side of the bed. Simply writing a few things down that you are thankful for or saying them outloud releases a combination of dopamine, oxytocin, and endorphins into your brain and helps you feel more positive. You’ll notice how life’s struggles and inconveniences pale in comparison to your blessings. 

Step 3: Practice Goal-Setting 

Creating a morning routine that’s filled with purpose adds structure to your day and allows you to concentrate on what you really want in life. When you race through your morning, chances are you aren’t focused on your goals. Instead set daily intentions right when you wake up, that will encourage you to be present and strive for your goals. 

We hope these three tips will help you center yourself and tackle your day. As a school counselor, a large part of your job is being there for others so we encourage you to set aside time for yourself every morning. For more inspiration around how to reset your morning routine, view the visual below! 

Scholarship Opportunity for your students – Upsolve Essay Scholarship

Upsolve, a national legal services nonprofit funded by the federal government and Harvard University is offering a scholarship opportunity to your students.

To empower the next generation of change-makers, they are encouraging students to submit short essays (500-1000 words) on how society can improve access to justice. The winning essay will receive $2,500.

These are the eligibility requirements:

  • Must be currently attending university or college or set to attend during 2021-2022 academic year;
  • Must apply via email and provide their name, university or college, major, and expected graduation month and year;
  • Must be in good standing with their current or prospective institution;
  • Provide their application (a two-page essay on your ideas for a more equitable legal system) by March 31, 2021

Here is a link with more information about their scholarship program: https://upsolve.org/scholarship/.

Tips for Parents During Remote Learning

We understand remote learning has its challenges. The two things we have seen successful students do during remote learning is communicate by asking for help and follow a daily schedule! Here are few tips to set your child up for success during the remote learning period.

Follow a Schedule

We understand remote learning has its challenges. The two things we have seen successful students do during remote learning is communicate by asking for help and follow a daily schedule! Here are a few tips to set your child up for success during the remote learning period at your school. Students thrive on structure. When things are unpredictable, a tool students need is a daily schedule. Here is template your student can use that you can customize for your school: Example schedule. Have them look up their teachers’ schedules so they know when they are available as well!

Set Daily Goals

Setting goals helps give our day purpose. When goals are achieved, it gives us a sense of accomplishment. Try using a daily goals sheet template like this.

Movement

Movement is mandatory for sustained energy and focus. Encourage breaks and stepping away from their workspace. Walking outside to get some fresh air a few times a day can make a huge difference in mood and motivation.

Ask for Help

A great predictor of success is a students’ ability to advocate for themselves and communicate with their teachers when they need help! Do not allow them to wait for a teacher to reach out to them. Have them stay on the google meet at the end of class to ask questions.

Connection

Loneliness and isolation can lead to a decline in mental health. Have your student set up FaceTime lunches or online study groups with friends. Find time to connect and have fun as a family. Lastly, have your student turn their camera on during class to feel more connected with their teacher and classmates!

Focus on Energy

Any type of positive feedback is important! This is a great opportunity to praise your students’ effort vs. their grades. Celebrate any positives you see in how they approach learning, or how they are connecting with teachers and showing resiliency.

School Work Refusal

We understand remote learning has not been easy or ideal for you or your student. It’s ok to reach out for extra support and ask for newi deas and resources if your student is not engaging in online work. Communicate with your student’s teachers or counselor to see if we can problem-solve together. This resource has great tips of how to encourage even the most reluctant learners. We are in this together!

This was provided by Leah Mueller-Grant a Counselor at Pulaski High School in Wisconsin

The hardest college to get accepted to in each state

The majority of colleges and universities in the United States accept most of the students who apply each year. However, there are institutions that are very selective, admitting a small share of those who apply.

24/7 did an analysis of admissions data from the National Center for Education Statistics and their index was based on admission rates as well as SAT scores of admitted students to measure the difficulty of being accepted to those universities and colleges.

Here is the list of those selective schools by state:

Alabama: The University of Alabama

• Location: Tuscaloosa 

• Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 59.1%

• Applicants for 2018-2019: 37,302

• Median SAT score: 1170 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $29,424

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 32,177

The University of Alabama football team has won 17 national championships, and current coach Nick Saban has won five national titles with the Crimson Tide. The college opened in 1831 and is the oldest public university in Alabama.

Alaska: University of Alaska Fairbanks

•​​​​​​​ Location: Fairbanks

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 76.1%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 1,683

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1160 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $18,510

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 4,657

The University of Alaska Fairbanks, the northernmost institution of higher learning on the list, is known for documenting and preserving 20 Indian, Aleut, and Eskimo languages through its Alaska Native Language Center.

Arizona: Arizona State University-Tempe

•​​​​​​​ Location: Tempe

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 84.8%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 26,869

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1245 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $25,621

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 42,529

Arizona State University collaborates with NASA, with students and faculty working with the space agency through the Space Grant Scholar program. The school is also known for its journalism, business, and engineering programs.

Arkansas: Lyon College

•​​​​​​​ Location: Batesville

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 49.9%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 1,741

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1114 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $38,173

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 655

Lyon College is a small liberal arts institution located in Batesville, Arkansas, in the foothills of the Ozark Mountains. The school, which opened in 1872, is closely associated with the Presbyterian Church and holds Scottish-themed festivals and events in acknowledgment of its Scottish heritage.

California: California Institute of Technology

•​​​​​​​ Location: Pasadena

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 6.6%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 8,208

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1555 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $68,901

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 948

The California Institute of Technology is known the world over for its science and engineering research. Alumni and faculty from the institution have been awarded 39 Nobel Prizes. Among them two-time winner Linus Pauling.

Colorado: United States Air Force Academy

•​​​​​​​ Location: Air Force Academy

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 11.4%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 10,376

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1320 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: N/A

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 4,336

The United States Air Force Academy opened its doors in 1954 in the Colorado Springs metro area after the government weighed 580 proposed sites in 45 states. Lt. Gen. Susan Helms, who graduated from the academy in 1980, has flown on five space shuttle missions.

Connecticut: Yale University

•​​​​​​​ Location: New Haven

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 6.3%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 35,301

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1515 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $71,290

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 5,963

Yale University was founded in 1701, the fourth-oldest college in the United States. Among its myriad distinctions is its long association with China, a relationship that dates from 1835. Students of the Ivy League university boast about its many student organizations, including singing, dancing, theater, and even juggling groups. Oscar-winning actors Meryl Streep and Jodie Foster, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and former presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush are among Yale alumni.

Delaware: University of Delaware

•​​​​​​​ Location: Newark

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 66.4%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 27,691

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1255 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $25,584

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 19,060

The University of Delaware, founded in 1743, is the largest university in America’s first state. Among its more notable alumni are former Vice President Joe Biden, former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, and actor Yvette Freeman.

Florida: University of Miami

•​​​​​​​ Location: Coral Gables

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 32.1%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 34,281

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1340 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $65,298

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 10,873

University of Miami is famous for its campus – considered to be one of the most beautiful in the nation. Although the school has made its mark in college football by winning five national championships, it is also known for its programs in the sciences, engineering, and music.

Georgia: Georgia Institute of Technology-Main Campus

•​​​​​​​ Location: Atlanta

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 21.5%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 35,644

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1465 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $28,501

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 15,201

The Georgia Institute of Technology is a world-renowned public research institution founded in Atlanta in 1885. Alumnus Kary Mullis won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1993. Though the workload at Georgia Tech is intense, students are able to follow Division I sports such as football and basketball as a diversion, and the Atlanta location affords them a variety of activities. The school also has campuses in Metz, France and Shenzhen, China.

Hawaii: Brigham Young University-Hawaii

•​​​​​​​ Location: Laie

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 44.8%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 2,970

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1167 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $18,043

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 3,040

BYU-Hawaii first opened its doors in 1955, approximately 110 years after a group of Latter-day Saint missionaries first landed in Hawaii. In the 2018-19 school year BYU-Hawaii accepted just 44.8% of applicants, the lowest acceptance rate of any school in Hawaii with available data. The median SAT score among first-year students was 1167 out of 1600, the highest such median of any college or university in the state.

Idaho: Northwest Nazarene University

•​​​​​​​ Location: Nampa

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 70.9%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 1,046

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1135 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $38,842

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 1,268

Northwest Nazarene University is a small liberal arts college founded in 1913 in Nampa, Idaho, about 20 miles west of Boise. Popular majors at the school today include business administration, nursing, and teaching.

Illinois: University of Chicago

•​​​​​​​ Location: Chicago

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 7.3%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 32,283

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1520 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $75,735

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 6,600

The University of Chicago is well-known for its academic rigor, particularly in the area of economics, and for faculty doing ground-breaking research. The institution boasts a handful of Nobel Prize winners – Saul Bellow-literature, George E. Smith-physics – and Pulitzer Prize recipients – Bret Stephens-commentary, Roger Ebert-criticism. Before he was president, Barack Obama taught at the University of Chicago Law School.

Indiana: University of Notre Dame

•​​​​​​​ Location: Notre Dame

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 17.7%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 20,371

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1475 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $69,395

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 8,568

Few American universities can boast a football legacy as rich as that of Notre Dame, a private Catholic research university founded in 1842. According to the NCAA, the school has 22 national football championships by major selectors, tied with the University of Alabama for the most of any Division I school. Notre Dame is also one of the most selective schools in the country. In the 2018-19 school year Notre Dame accepted just 17.7% of applicants, the lowest acceptance rate in Indiana and among the lowest of any school nationwide.

Iowa: Grinnell College

•​​​​​​​ Location: Grinnell

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 24.4%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 7,349

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1451 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $65,814

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 1,683

Grinnell College, a small private liberal arts school in Grinnell, Iowa, describes itself as “quirky” and “curious.” The Midwestern school was founded in 1846, and its theme is commitment to the common good.

Kansas: Bethel College-North Newton

•​​​​​​​ Location: North Newton

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 44.1%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 1,093

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1035 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $41,204

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 442

Located in the center of Kansas, Bethel College in North Newton was the first Mennonite college founded in North America in 1887. It was established in the tradition of progressive Christian liberal arts values and the school says it tries to prepare its students to become critical thinkers and global citizens. With just 442 undergraduates, it is the smallest school on the list.

Kentucky: Berea College

•​​​​​​​ Location: Berea

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 38.2%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 1,576

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1122 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $35,394

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 1,630

Founded in 1855 and deeply rooted in Appalachian history and culture, Berea College was the first interracial and coeducational college in the South. It is also tuition-free, relying on endowment income, gifts, and financial aid. All students must work at least 10 hours a week in jobs on campus and in the community.

Louisiana: Tulane University of Louisiana

•​​​​​​​ Location: New Orleans

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 17.3%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 38,816

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1420 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $69,517

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 7,920

Tulane University in New Orleans was founded as a medical college in 1834 to train doctors to treat diseases such as yellow fever, malaria, and smallpox that were ravaging the port city. Tropical medicine remains one of the degrees offered at Tulane, along with architecture, business, law, liberal arts, the sciences, engineering, and social work.

Maine: Colby College

•​​​​​​​ Location: Waterville

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 13.1%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 12,313

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1430 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $68,582

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 2,000

Colby College, a private liberal arts institution founded in 1813, is located in Waterville, Maine, about 20 miles north of the state capital of Augusta. Like most relatively selective schools, Colby College is relatively expensive – the typical cost of attending the school is approximately $68,582. Of other degree-granting institutions in the state, only Bates has a higher sticker price.

Maryland: Johns Hopkins University

•​​​​​​​ Location: Baltimore

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 11.5%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 29,776

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1505 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $69,863

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 5,567

Founded in 1876, Johns Hopkins University touts itself as “America’s first research institution.” The university’s founding mission was to bring knowledge to the world. The university is well known for its medical school, which US News ranked second after Harvard University for research.

Massachusetts: Harvard University

•​​​​​​​ Location: Cambridge

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 4.7%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 42,749

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1520 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $71,135

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 7,582

There are no shortage of superlatives when it comes to Ivy League Harvard University. It is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States, founded in 1636; it has produced more presidents, eight, than any university; it has the largest academic library in the world; and it produced 48 Nobel Laureates, 32 heads of state, 48 Pulitzer Prize winners.

Michigan: University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

•​​​​​​​ Location: Ann Arbor

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 22.8%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 64,917

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1420 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $29,407

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 30,079

The average annual cost of attending the University of Michigan is $29,407, one of the lower price tags among the nation’s most selective educational institutions. It is also one of the largest colleges on this list, with more than 30,000 undergraduate students. Fewer than one in every four applicants were accepted for the 2018-2019 school year.

Minnesota: Carleton College

•​​​​​​​ Location: Northfield

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 19.8%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 7,092

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1440 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $68,835

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 2,046

Carleton College, located in Northfield, Minnesota, about 44 miles south of Minneapolis, is a small private liberal arts school that stresses interdisciplinary scholarship. The Carleton student community is described in the Princeton Review as tight knit and supportive. Among the notable alumni are Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jonathan Capehart and Melvin Laird, secretary of defense under President Richard Nixon.

Mississippi: Mississippi College

•​​​​​​​ Location: Clinton

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 38.4%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 2,216

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1134 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $32,102

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 3,036

Mississippi College, located in Clinton, which is about 11 miles west of the state capital of Jackson, was founded in 1826 and is the oldest institution of higher learning in Mississippi. It is affiliated with the Mississippi Baptist Convention, offering programs in the liberal arts and sciences, nursing, and business. The school’s stated vision is to be “recognized for academic excellence and commitment to the cause of Christ.”

Missouri: Washington University in St. Louis

•​​​​​​​ Location: St. Louis

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 15%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 31,320

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1520 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $71,975

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 7,356

Students at Washington University in St. Louis can design their own curriculum to help them to pursue different areas of study. The school was founded in 1853, and its hilltop campus was designed by noted landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted in 1895.

Montana: Rocky Mountain College

•​​​​​​​ Location: Billings

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 58.4%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 1,521

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1083 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $38,639

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 879

Rocky Mountain College was founded in 1878 in Billings, Montana. At RMC, one of the smallest schools on the list with 897 undergraduates, students can go skiing, rafting, backpacking, and rock climbing, and get class credit.

Nebraska: Creighton University

•​​​​​​​ Location: Omaha

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 71.4%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 10,112

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1250 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $52,931

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 4,405

Creighton University, opened in 1878, is a Jesuit-run institution of higher education located in Omaha, Nebraska. Among its more notable alumni is Bob Gibson, Hall of Fame pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Nevada: University of Nevada-Las Vegas

•​​​​​​​ Location: Las Vegas

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 82%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 11,612

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1135 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $17,582

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 24,707

University of Nevada-Las Vegas is one of the newer schools on the list, founded in 1957. Because the school is located in Las Vegas, not surprisingly, one of its colleges is The William F. Harrah College of Hospitality. UNLV also has schools for engineering, nursing, business, and urban affairs.

New Hampshire: Dartmouth College

•​​​​​​​ Location: Hanover

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 8.7%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 22,033

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1490 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $71,827

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 4,312

Dartmouth College was founded in 1769 by Rev. Eleazar Wheelock as a learning institution for Native Americans. In addition to one of the most competitive undergraduate admissions, the Ivy League university’s professional schools – the Geisel School of Medicine, Thayer School of Engineering, and the Tuck School of Business – are some of the most selective in the world.

Among its alumni is statesman and orator Daniel Webster, who served as secretary of state under three presidents, as well as American author Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss.

New Jersey: Princeton University

•​​​​​​​ Location: Princeton

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 5.5%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 35,370

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1505 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $66,950

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 5,301

Princeton University, founded in 1746, is among the hardest schools in the country to gain admittance. The Ivy League university played another New Jersey college, Rutgers, in the first collegiate football game in 1869. Among Princeton’s notable alumni are Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos, former first lady Michelle Obama, mathematician and among the developers of computer science Alan Turing, and actor James Stewart.

New Mexico: New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

•​​​​​​​ Location: Socorro

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 23.2%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 1,740

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1305 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $21,244

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 1,333

The New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, founded in 1889 – before New Mexico became a state, is located in the town of Socorro, about 76 miles south of Albuquerque. In addition to mining, it offers courses of study in biology, chemistry, chemical engineering, business, and technology management.

New York: Columbia University in the City of New York

•​​​​​​​ Location: New York

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 5.9%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 40,572

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1505 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $74,435

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 8,216

Columbia University, founded in 1754 on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, is one of the most difficult colleges to attend anywhere. Only 5.9% of applicants were accepted for the 2018-2019 school year. The university is also one of the most expensive, with an average annual cost of attendance of $74,435.

North Carolina: Duke University

•​​​​​​​ Location: Durham

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 8.9%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 35,786

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1510 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $72,466

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 6,596

Duke University’s very successful men’s basketball team has helped raise the profile of the prestigious institution where students can major in computer science, economics, and public policy, among other courses of study. Duke is also known for its law school, whose graduates include Richard Nixon, the 37th president of the United States.

North Dakota: Minot State University

•​​​​​​​ Location: Minot

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 50.1%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 1,040

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1025 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $15,576

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 2,410

Minot State University is located in the northern part of North Dakota in the city of Minot. It is a public university founded in 1913 as a teaching institution to serve the North Dakota prairie. Minot State’s most popular majors are business administration and management, nursing, and teaching.

Ohio: Case Western Reserve University

•​​​​​​​ Location: Cleveland

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 29.3%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 26,642

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1435 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $67,083

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 5,131

Case Western Reserve University was founded in 1826. About one-third of Case’s students belong to fraternities or sororities. Among its notable alumni are former Representative and presidential candidate Dennis Kucinich and Craigslist founder Craig Newmark.

Oklahoma: University of Tulsa

•​​​​​​​ Location: Tulsa

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 40.8%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 8,526

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1295 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $56,906

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 3,246

The University of Tulsa, founded in 1894, is a private institution known for its petroleum engineering programs, which are taught in a facility that features a drilling simulator. The school opened one of the first mosques on a college campus in the nation. More than half of the students come from out of state, including from nearly 70 countries.

Oregon: Reed College

•​​​​​​​ Location: Portland

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 35%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 5,957

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1415 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $69,734

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 1,456

Reed College, located in Portland, Oregon, is a small private liberal arts college that was founded in 1908. It has one of the lower acceptance rates on this list, at 35%. The college claims its curriculum includes a unique incorporation of classical studies across its disciplines.

Pennsylvania: University of Pennsylvania

•​​​​​​​ Location: Philadelphia

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 8.4%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 44,491

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1485 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $72,584

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 10,764

The University of Pennsylvania is another of the Ivy League schools founded in colonial times, in 1740 by Benjamin Franklin. According to Princeton Review, students laud the university for its combination of urban setting with a traditional college campus. Poet William Carlos Williams is an alumnus of Penn.

Rhode Island: Brown University

•​​​​​​​ Location: Providence

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 7.7%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 35,437

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1485 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $71,050

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 6,752

Ivy League schools are the hardest colleges to get into in their respective states, and Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, is among them. Brown students design their own courses of study. Brown’s English and history programs are well-regarded, as is its Warren Alpert Medical School. Business moguls John D. Rockefeller Jr. and Ted Turner are Brown alumni.

South Carolina: Clemson University

•​​​​​​​ Location: Clemson

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 47.2%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 28,845

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1310 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $29,499

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 19,564

Clemson University’s profile has been raised in recent years by the success of its football program, which has won two national championships in the last four years. Commonly chosen majors at Clemson, founded in 1889, range from accounting to youth development. Students frequently participate in projects that include combating bullying in South Carolina high schools.

South Dakota: Augustana University

•​​​​​​​ Location: Sioux Falls

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 65.4%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 2,201

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1195 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $45,145

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 1,752

Augustana College, located at Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is a private liberal arts school affiliated with the Lutheran Church. The school was founded in 1860, before South Dakota became a state. “Entertainment Tonight” host Mary Hart is an alumna of Augustana.

Tennessee: Vanderbilt University

•​​​​​​​ Location: Nashville

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 9.6%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 34,313

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1505 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $67,392

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 6,840

Vanderbilt University owes its origins to railroad mogul Cornelius Vanderbilt, who gave $1 million to the university in 1873. Vanderbilt, one of the South’s most prestigious schools, is known for its undergraduate pre-med program and medical school. Vanderbilt alumni Al Gore Jr. and Muhammad Yunas each won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 and 2006, respectively.

Texas: Rice University

•​​​​​​​ Location: Houston

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 11.1%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 20,923

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1505 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $63,158

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 3,962

Rice University, founded in 1912 and located in Houston’s Museum District, has been ranked by the Princeton Review as having the happiest students in the United States. Princeton Review cited Rice students’ favorable experiences with faculty, research capabilities, and collaboration with outside institutions. Rice alumnus Alberto R. Gonzales became the nation’s first Hispanic attorney general in 2005.

Utah: Brigham Young University-Provo

•​​​​​​​ Location: Provo

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 64.5%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 11,205

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1305 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $18,136

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 31,441

Brigham Young University was founded by the Mormon Church in 1875. Students are asked to adhere to its “honor code” that requires abstinence from drugs, alcohol, tobacco, coffee, tea, and what the church views as “inappropriate” “sexual activity, such as sex outside of marriage. About 25% of Brigham Young students are married.

Vermont: Middlebury College

•​​​​​​​ Location: Middlebury

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 16.7%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 9,227

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1415 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $69,464

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 2,550

Middlebury College, founded in 1800, is regarded as one of the most rigorous small private liberal arts colleges in the U.S. Middlebury’s scenic location near mountains, lakes, and ski trails, likely attracts students who value the outdoors.

Virginia: Washington and Lee University

•​​​​​​​ Location: Lexington

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 21.2%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 5,855

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1419 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $67,150

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 1,822

Washington and Lee University, founded in 1749, was named after George Washington, who made an endowment to the school, and Confederate general Robert E. Lee, who became president of the college after the Civil War. Greek life plays a big role in the social environment of the school, with 80% of students belonging to fraternities and sororities. Author Tom Wolfe and explorer Meriwether Lewis of the Lewis and Clark Expedition are among the school’s notable alumni.

Washington: University of Washington-Seattle Campus

•​​​​​​​ Location: Seattle

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 48.7%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 45,907

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1340 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $25,275

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 30,905

Founded in 1861, University of Washington is one of the oldest public universities in the western United States and one of the largest schools on the list. The university’s main campus is in Seattle.

West Virginia: Davis & Elkins College

•​​​​​​​ Location: Elkins

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 37%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 2,495

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 995 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $40,551

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 756

Davis & Elkins College is a private institution of higher learning affiliated with the Presbyterian Church in Elkins, West Virginia, which is near the Maryland border. It is one of the smaller colleges on the list, with total undergraduate enrollment of 756 students.

Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin-Madison

•​​​​​​​ Location: Madison

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 51.7%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 42,727

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1365 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $25,497

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 30,360

University of Wisconsin-Madison’s children’s hospital was the site of the first bone marrow transplant in 1968. Twenty alumni have won a Nobel prize. Novelist Joyce Carol Oates, progressive politician Robert M. La Follette, and architect Frank Lloyd Wright are among the school’s alumni.

Wyoming: University of Wyoming

•​​​​​​​ Location: Laramie

•​​​​​​​ Acceptance rate for 2018-2019: 96%

•​​​​​​​ Applicants for 2018-2019: 5,293

•​​​​​​​ Median SAT score: 1165 out of 1600

•​​​​​​​ Avg. annual cost of attendance: $19,777

•​​​​​​​ Four-year undergraduate enrollment, fall 2018: 9,854

The University of Wyoming, founded in 1886, is located in Laramie and is situated between two mountain ranges. The school is the only four-year university in Wyoming, and at 96%, it has the highest acceptance rate on the list. Former Vice President Dick Cheney is a UW alumnus.

Newer Posts
Older Posts

Link for Counselors